Thursday, December 13, 2012

WWWTP? Alzheimer's 'Drug'

I dub thee "Artistic Lead I"
(K.C.N. would be so proud!)
Source: ADDF
From the Twitterverse came a link to Estee Lauder's Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF). A nobel effort, to be sure, but check out their "molecule" on the home page.

Anyone have any idea what this could be? I remember learning that (generally) red = O, black = C, yellow = S, and blue = N, but what's "shiny pearlescent purple?" (tungsten?). My guess would be that any structure with 2 cyclic N-O bonds and a reduced sulfoxide would be quite unstable, but that's me...

If anyone knows what they were trying for, let me know in the comments.

Update (9:25AM) - Here's my rendering in ChemDraw:


19 comments:

  1. Yeah, I'd hate to run a DSC on that bad boy. But not only that—I can't quite tell from the angle, but isn't that a Texas carbon?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I believe you have it nailed. Good catch!

      Delete
  2. it has to be a phosphorus then

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I may support that view, too. If so...yikes.

      Delete
  3. Don't want to be a killjoy but every student knows that the small green monovalent spheres are chlorine (according to the box lid). Which definitely moves this into Main Group Chemistry territory. The grey atom (which *appears* to be divalent is a poser because grey is usually reserved for metals and divalent metals don't tend to be bent. That said the supplier indicates that only a trivalent metal atom is available (http://www.indigo.com/models/molymod-molecular-model-components.html) so that suggests an open valence or a lone pair behind the grey atom. A metal atom with a lone pair is a rare thing suggesting a heavier Main Group metal such as a germene (R2Ge:), tinene (R2Sn:) or plumbene (R2Pb:). I also dislike the use of the springy pi bond connectors for single bonds. Who would have thought the bisphenoidal carbon would be the second most interesting part of this molecule?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is becoming quite the structural melange.

      Delete
  4. In those kits green was chlorine, white was hydrogen. I'm not sure where they found a black pentavalent ball, though- maybe they drilled an extra hole?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When you have to bring out power tools, your molecule likely doesn't exist...

      Delete
    2. I think it's the trigonal bipyramid you can use to show the transition state in SN_2. It's just the angle that makes in look like a square pyramid.

      Delete
    3. I've got the kit, the trigonal carbons for aromatic systems have a hole on the top and bottom, so you can put orbitals on, etc. From the angles you can see in the pic, it looks trig bipy, which would fit with that.

      Delete
  5. Yep, you should change the green H with halogen.... moreover I never saw the W.... amazing

    ReplyDelete
  6. or it's just molecular modeling combinatorial chemistry. Better than trying it in in a flask...

    ReplyDelete
  7. I like the greens being Cl. How about As for the black. It also looks like there's a second bond extending from the O attached to the S, that's pointed to something under the O between the black and blue spheres. Leaving aside the chemistry mess, the shadows don't make any sense compared to the model; definitely not an art director or graphic artist I'd consider hiring...

    ReplyDelete
  8. Perhaps more a noble effort than a Nobel effort.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was trying to work out whether that was a joke too subtle or obscure for anyone outside the industry (e.g. me) to understand.

      Delete
  9. To a biologist, this looks the same like the rainbow of colors published in Nat Chem Biol, Vol 9, Jan 2013, p. 12, http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/v9/n1/pdf/nchembio.1139.pdf
    with orange Fe and green Ni. This time, it's a structure of active site of dehydrogenase. You chemists. Why would any artist try to find an inspiration in your lowly field?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I forgot to add. Such inspiration explains Texas carbon - the black ball is pentavalent Fe. "Shiny pearlescent purple" is still somehow Fourier transformed object from a Christmas tree. Good thing is that even authors of the original paper do not know what coordinates between Fe and Ni. Just look at the mysterious question mark in the structure of NiA, Fig. 1 a of the paper by Hamdan, http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/v9/n1/pdf/nchembio.1110.pdf

      Delete
    2. And don't blame the artist for linking Fe directly to Ni. That's what Jmol does, at least in this case: http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/explore/jmol.do?structureId=2FRV&bionumber=1

      Delete
  10. I'm pretty sure I may have seen this beauty hurtling across the sky whilst out looking at the Geminids display last night.

    ReplyDelete